[Review] The Streets Live – “Don’t Mug Yourself “

  • Jamie L

  • Wed 9th 2018

  • Music

  • no responses

Mike Skinner

“Is that all you’ve got Brixton?? Y’know I’ve been waiting 7 long years for this?! Don’t you disappoint me!”

This Northern Lout got a chance to beat his rug again at none other than London’s most raucous gigging venue. I return here after a garage night at The Prince of Wales Rooftop last weekend.

I bought my ticket from Viagogo. It should be called Vianogo some punters paying double the face value. My favourite part of going to the Brixton bubble is that the gig starts at the tube station. The way is lined by Ticket Touts shouting, “any tickets?

The venues so packed the urinals are overflowing. Every bar is 5 people deep and, despite my begging, no one will buy me a Rum + Coke. Where’s the humanity gone?? The bar staff are clearly overworked and I offer to give a tenner to 3 different groups of people 

I finally get a drink and meet with some friends front left by the speakers. 

The truth is, Mike Skinner never went away. He still djs on a weekly basis and he’s shared some of Grime’s limelight in his most recent Noisey documentaries on 67 and the scene. This
explains his look of surprise throughout his set – perhaps at being allowed onstage again.
“Envy eats everyone like rust on the paint” – a lyric from his 2018 release (ironically wack compared to his original stuff). 

His rustiness was noticeable throughout the set but that’s the essence of The Streets. “Wheel that one back. Wheel it back”. They can’t Mike, because they’re a live band. Another sign that Mike is a born dj, pining for that playback button. He repeated this phrase several times throughout the set. In terms of a live band replicating electronic sounds, they were excellent, the only criticism would be that the sound was a little off when Mike jumped around and lost his in-ear monitors. At the end of the day I would trade that off than have a clinically corporate performance from a band that has no soul or enthusiasm to be there. (when his monitors and battery pack fell off) “Wow this is service. You don’t get a guy coming up behind you to fix it when you’re in the booth”

The only bored one on stage was the Streets DJ he sat with no animation on his vape for the entirety of the gig. The rest of the band reshuffle is tasty, with funkier basslines and a technically gifted drummer.

The strings start on “Turn The Page” and the room erupted into anarchy like the teacher just left the classroom. The tempo didn’t decrease as we hurtled into “Push Things Forward” and “Don’t Mug Yourself”

“You say that everything sounds the same Then you go buy them! There’s no excuses my friend”– the lyrics that ring the truest 16 years on.

He began with The Original Pirate Material and then he dotted it with his moanier modern ballads like “Everything is Borrowed”. Now, “Has it come to this?” – lock down your aerial and back to the anarchy as Skinner does his 3 rd stage dive of the night coupled with popping the 3 rd of O2’s finest champagne, and he’s “having all that’s in the bubble in the bottom of the bottle”.

I will never forget the moment I look around The Academy and see all the mess heads chanting ‘Never Went to Church’ shoulder to shoulder.
‘Too much brandy’ was next – the infamous nature of the Streets sets of dotting slow songs about breakup and death then lurching into a story about a lucid weekend in Amsterdam.

Now segwaying back to the slow tempo. ‘It’s too late’ and ‘could well be in’. Beautiful melodies, again the most touching part is watching the wreckheads, moshing 5 minutes ago and now crying into each other’s bucket hats.
(It then gets very religious here; which makes you question whether the Skinner family did actually go to church; every Sunday)
Then ‘The Escapist’, something that goes through my mind as ‘Dry your eyes mate’ comes on.

I usually hate this one but the whole crowd launches into singing along like Skinner’s gospel choir again. This shows how the sad break-up songs strike the largest spread of the public’s chords.

I get why he had to show of this smorgasbord from his musical career. This tour was a symbolic victory lap instead of a comeback (similar to Usain Bolt’s last lap in front of the crowd…before he crashed out). This old warhorse needed to lay out his full hand when it came to his colourful career. But still, Mike, you should have stuck to the old stuff.

Mike stands on the front speaker addressing his subjects, wearing aloft a pair of glasses and blue hat stolen from them.

“Whoa you guys are too much for me to handle, I need to get help”

Unclear up until the end whether this was psychological help or whether he was going to handpick some of his friends from the grime community.

Murkage Dave runs on and they performed a bouncy version of ‘bat phone’. The kit came into its own at this point, providing a cymbal lick reminiscent of ‘Eskimo Pulse’ mashed with Mike’s pre-recorded drums.
Lethal Bizzle runs on with a bottle of Verve and the audience gives itself a wet t-shirt contest with any remaining beer as pandemonium ensues. Skepta was also visible in the hype at the wings but unfortunately had no numbers rehearsed with the newly reshaped band.

Now they leave and only their abandoned instruments are visible through the blue fog.

Of course, this wasn’t the end – it felt more like an intermission with the amount of banging encores that followed. The buzz-cut now runs back onstage ripping off his signature black tee.

“Wave God”, “Open The Tills” and “Boys Will Be Boys”. “Weak Become Heroes” is a finally a perfect song to end on. I shifty through the crowd to the cloakroom early and the lyrics boom out: “A sea of people all equal, smiles in front and behind me.

Swim in the deep blue sea, cornfields sway lazily. All smiles all easy, where do you come from what you on and what’s your story?”

This tour was a homage to Lad culture whilst being starkly self- deprecating towards it – “Dry Your Eyes Mate”,  “Don’t Mug Yourself” – reminding us that Mike has always been chatting about something public perception just cottoned onto.

It was good to see this Mancunian’s invigorated band but I couldn’t help but think that he has less energy than he used to.
Kevin Mark Trail certainly provided most of the energy to the set, even though Mike once called him “just a session musician” during an interview in the Noughties. There’s not that much rapport between the two of them anymore and Mike still takes all of the limelight. If Kevin was brought to the front then maybe that could create the atmosphere for The Streets comeback.

I stop for a beer as the crowd spills out onto Stockwell Road and manage to catch a verdict before the crowd dissipates.
“It was a rowdy sweat dripping off the walls beer in the air type gig full of raw passion and emotion the soundtrack of hundreds of fans reliving their youth and letting their hair down after a working day, it felt more like a Saturday than a Wednesday. It’s what you want from a gig experience really” Tony Rhodes – Music fanatic from Bournemouth.

 

 

 

 

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Mike Skinner

“Is that all you’ve got Brixton?? Y’know I’ve been waiting 7 long years for this?! Don’t you disappoint me!”

This Northern Lout got a chance to beat his rug again at none other than London’s most raucous gigging venue. I return here after a garage night at The Prince of Wales Rooftop last weekend.

I bought my ticket from Viagogo. It should be called Vianogo some punters paying double the face value. My favourite part of going to the Brixton bubble is that the gig starts at the tube station. The way is lined by Ticket Touts shouting, “any tickets?

The venues so packed the urinals are overflowing. Every bar is 5 people deep and, despite my begging, no one will buy me a Rum + Coke. Where’s the humanity gone?? The bar staff are clearly overworked and I offer to give a tenner to 3 different groups of people 

I finally get a drink and meet with some friends front left by the speakers. 

The truth is, Mike Skinner never went away. He still djs on a weekly basis and he’s shared some of Grime’s limelight in his most recent Noisey documentaries on 67 and the scene. This
explains his look of surprise throughout his set – perhaps at being allowed onstage again.
“Envy eats everyone like rust on the paint” – a lyric from his 2018 release (ironically wack compared to his original stuff). 

His rustiness was noticeable throughout the set but that’s the essence of The Streets. “Wheel that one back. Wheel it back”. They can’t Mike, because they’re a live band. Another sign that Mike is a born dj, pining for that playback button. He repeated this phrase several times throughout the set. In terms of a live band replicating electronic sounds, they were excellent, the only criticism would be that the sound was a little off when Mike jumped around and lost his in-ear monitors. At the end of the day I would trade that off than have a clinically corporate performance from a band that has no soul or enthusiasm to be there. (when his monitors and battery pack fell off) “Wow this is service. You don’t get a guy coming up behind you to fix it when you’re in the booth”

The only bored one on stage was the Streets DJ he sat with no animation on his vape for the entirety of the gig. The rest of the band reshuffle is tasty, with funkier basslines and a technically gifted drummer.

The strings start on “Turn The Page” and the room erupted into anarchy like the teacher just left the classroom. The tempo didn’t decrease as we hurtled into “Push Things Forward” and “Don’t Mug Yourself”

“You say that everything sounds the same Then you go buy them! There’s no excuses my friend”– the lyrics that ring the truest 16 years on.

He began with The Original Pirate Material and then he dotted it with his moanier modern ballads like “Everything is Borrowed”. Now, “Has it come to this?” – lock down your aerial and back to the anarchy as Skinner does his 3 rd stage dive of the night coupled with popping the 3 rd of O2’s finest champagne, and he’s “having all that’s in the bubble in the bottom of the bottle”.

I will never forget the moment I look around The Academy and see all the mess heads chanting ‘Never Went to Church’ shoulder to shoulder.
‘Too much brandy’ was next – the infamous nature of the Streets sets of dotting slow songs about breakup and death then lurching into a story about a lucid weekend in Amsterdam.

Now segwaying back to the slow tempo. ‘It’s too late’ and ‘could well be in’. Beautiful melodies, again the most touching part is watching the wreckheads, moshing 5 minutes ago and now crying into each other’s bucket hats.
(It then gets very religious here; which makes you question whether the Skinner family did actually go to church; every Sunday)
Then ‘The Escapist’, something that goes through my mind as ‘Dry your eyes mate’ comes on.

I usually hate this one but the whole crowd launches into singing along like Skinner’s gospel choir again. This shows how the sad break-up songs strike the largest spread of the public’s chords.

I get why he had to show of this smorgasbord from his musical career. This tour was a symbolic victory lap instead of a comeback (similar to Usain Bolt’s last lap in front of the crowd…before he crashed out). This old warhorse needed to lay out his full hand when it came to his colourful career. But still, Mike, you should have stuck to the old stuff.

Mike stands on the front speaker addressing his subjects, wearing aloft a pair of glasses and blue hat stolen from them.

“Whoa you guys are too much for me to handle, I need to get help”

Unclear up until the end whether this was psychological help or whether he was going to handpick some of his friends from the grime community.

Murkage Dave runs on and they performed a bouncy version of ‘bat phone’. The kit came into its own at this point, providing a cymbal lick reminiscent of ‘Eskimo Pulse’ mashed with Mike’s pre-recorded drums.
Lethal Bizzle runs on with a bottle of Verve and the audience gives itself a wet t-shirt contest with any remaining beer as pandemonium ensues. Skepta was also visible in the hype at the wings but unfortunately had no numbers rehearsed with the newly reshaped band.

Now they leave and only their abandoned instruments are visible through the blue fog.

Of course, this wasn’t the end – it felt more like an intermission with the amount of banging encores that followed. The buzz-cut now runs back onstage ripping off his signature black tee.

“Wave God”, “Open The Tills” and “Boys Will Be Boys”. “Weak Become Heroes” is a finally a perfect song to end on. I shifty through the crowd to the cloakroom early and the lyrics boom out: “A sea of people all equal, smiles in front and behind me.

Swim in the deep blue sea, cornfields sway lazily. All smiles all easy, where do you come from what you on and what’s your story?”

This tour was a homage to Lad culture whilst being starkly self- deprecating towards it – “Dry Your Eyes Mate”,  “Don’t Mug Yourself” – reminding us that Mike has always been chatting about something public perception just cottoned onto.

It was good to see this Mancunian’s invigorated band but I couldn’t help but think that he has less energy than he used to.
Kevin Mark Trail certainly provided most of the energy to the set, even though Mike once called him “just a session musician” during an interview in the Noughties. There’s not that much rapport between the two of them anymore and Mike still takes all of the limelight. If Kevin was brought to the front then maybe that could create the atmosphere for The Streets comeback.

I stop for a beer as the crowd spills out onto Stockwell Road and manage to catch a verdict before the crowd dissipates.
“It was a rowdy sweat dripping off the walls beer in the air type gig full of raw passion and emotion the soundtrack of hundreds of fans reliving their youth and letting their hair down after a working day, it felt more like a Saturday than a Wednesday. It’s what you want from a gig experience really” Tony Rhodes – Music fanatic from Bournemouth.

 

 

 

 

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