Artist without Borders : Killy

  • Marwa

  • Tue 19th 2017

  • Music

  • no responses

killy

Source: Google

It’s here. The revolution has started. The days of dance music and rock bands dominating the music scene, has come to a halt. Hip hop and other genres derived from urban culture have taken over. From Cardi B dominating the billboards, to Daniel Ceasar‘s huge breakthrough R’n’B album, the faces of music have shifted. It’s about time too. For years, the influence of urban culture has been seen from major acts that did not come from that same cloth. However, we are now seeing artists embrace the culture, and showcase their talents that derived from it. This column will highlight artists that are breaking ground in their musical careers, and being a part of the musical revolution.

Growing up, the faces of RnB/HIp-hop, were typically of african origin. Or “black”, depending on what your personal views are on using colour to describe a group of people. But I digress. The point is, those genres of music were associated with a certain race of people. Fast forward to 2017, it is not uncommon for a “non-black” person to have a hit rap song. Hip hop has travelled the world, and its beloved forefathers have helped educate people of all creeds, of its deep history, and dope dance moves. It makes sense that hip hop is the most consumed genre in music.

Now let me take you to the East end of Toronto. This is where the likes of The Weeknd, and Baka Not Nice reign from. His name is Killy. He’s 19 and has already shared stages with some of your favourite performers (i.e.. Travis Scott, Sza, and Dave East), and has the internet buzzing with his music. I would recommend his music to those of you looking for something to hype you up in the gym, or when you’re conflicted on whether or not you wanna give someone a second chance after failing you. Listen to his hit Kilimanjaro, and that decision is an easy one.

When I first heard his dark, melodic music, it came at a pivotal time in my life, where I was conflicted on ending a relationship. You know the story: girl meets boy, feelings develop, then girl finds out he’s really just an insensitive prick, and she becomes an ice queen. Ya, that tale. I played “Distance” and heard him say “I don’t think you really know the feeling. See me as a hero or a villain, probably gonna see me on a building.” I stopped the song and thought about it. I wasn’t going to be able to level with said boy, or get him to understand my feelings and behaviour, but the one thing I was sure of was that something great was in store for me, regardless of the toxicity of that relationship. It’s a subtle lyric, but its effects were major. Killy is still fairly early in his musical career but his moves and releases are very calculated, which I can appreciate. He makes a conscious effort to not release anything below his set standard, which is clearly one of a high caliber. With a focus on melody, and great quality sound and visuals, Killy’s star continues to rise.

Follow Killy on Twitter: @hoodhokage and check out his music via https://soundcloud.com/hoodhokage

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killy

Source: Google

It’s here. The revolution has started. The days of dance music and rock bands dominating the music scene, has come to a halt. Hip hop and other genres derived from urban culture have taken over. From Cardi B dominating the billboards, to Daniel Ceasar‘s huge breakthrough R’n’B album, the faces of music have shifted. It’s about time too. For years, the influence of urban culture has been seen from major acts that did not come from that same cloth. However, we are now seeing artists embrace the culture, and showcase their talents that derived from it. This column will highlight artists that are breaking ground in their musical careers, and being a part of the musical revolution.

Growing up, the faces of RnB/HIp-hop, were typically of african origin. Or “black”, depending on what your personal views are on using colour to describe a group of people. But I digress. The point is, those genres of music were associated with a certain race of people. Fast forward to 2017, it is not uncommon for a “non-black” person to have a hit rap song. Hip hop has travelled the world, and its beloved forefathers have helped educate people of all creeds, of its deep history, and dope dance moves. It makes sense that hip hop is the most consumed genre in music.

Now let me take you to the East end of Toronto. This is where the likes of The Weeknd, and Baka Not Nice reign from. His name is Killy. He’s 19 and has already shared stages with some of your favourite performers (i.e.. Travis Scott, Sza, and Dave East), and has the internet buzzing with his music. I would recommend his music to those of you looking for something to hype you up in the gym, or when you’re conflicted on whether or not you wanna give someone a second chance after failing you. Listen to his hit Kilimanjaro, and that decision is an easy one.

When I first heard his dark, melodic music, it came at a pivotal time in my life, where I was conflicted on ending a relationship. You know the story: girl meets boy, feelings develop, then girl finds out he’s really just an insensitive prick, and she becomes an ice queen. Ya, that tale. I played “Distance” and heard him say “I don’t think you really know the feeling. See me as a hero or a villain, probably gonna see me on a building.” I stopped the song and thought about it. I wasn’t going to be able to level with said boy, or get him to understand my feelings and behaviour, but the one thing I was sure of was that something great was in store for me, regardless of the toxicity of that relationship. It’s a subtle lyric, but its effects were major. Killy is still fairly early in his musical career but his moves and releases are very calculated, which I can appreciate. He makes a conscious effort to not release anything below his set standard, which is clearly one of a high caliber. With a focus on melody, and great quality sound and visuals, Killy’s star continues to rise.

Follow Killy on Twitter: @hoodhokage and check out his music via https://soundcloud.com/hoodhokage

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