[Article] Wiley – Godfather II Review

  • mitch

  • Sun 27th 2018

  • Music

  • no responses

wiley

After the first Godfather album last year, Wiley is back with the second instalment of the franchise. Wiley is one of the most talented and respected artists in the grime scene, much less the UK scene as a whole. I was eager to hear this one!

Wiley begins the album the way a typically grime based artist would be expected to. A grime intro plus the flows we’re used to from him.

I was first drawn to the fact that Wiley has chosen to put across a theme about having the passion for the music he wants to make, rather than making songs just for the money. In the song ‘” I call the shots”, he mentions “Chasing numbers and views” and forgetting about the mic. He references this ideology in a few other songs and that’s a running theme throughout the album.

You wouldn’t know it from the outset if you listen to the first few songs, but this album is very diverse. The structure is not what I expected but made more sense as the album progressed. It begins really ‘grimey’ then goes into softer, more mellow songs a bit later. This album seems modelled after his own career in terms of starting with grime, then dabbling in other genres later. I think this is done deliberately, sticking to the theme mentioned earlier.

I would have loved to have heard some BBK members on this album or even some old Roll Deep other than Scratchy. This is not to say Scratchy doesn’t do well because he sure does. The features really done what they needed to do in terms of their effectiveness and none of them were misplaced. I particularly enjoyed the tracks that featured the grime legends D Double E and JME. He features Shakka and one of my personal favourites Wretch 32, as well as a host of others, from MC’s to vocalists. I feel like Wiley was very aware what each artist featured, brought to the table.

He went very traditional with an album length of 12 songs, something that’s almost unheard of in the streaming era. I think he put this amount of songs on the album to show how thorough he was when making it, as opposed to putting rubbish on for streaming purposes, which would open the possibility of making more money from this project.

My only criticism of this album is a personal one. As a fan since Wiley was spitting bars on radio sets and forming different crews, I would’ve liked to hear something that sounded old school. While I’m aware that artists move with the times, the fan in me is what made me listen to the album. Possibly a freestyle on an old school beat, even as an interlude somewhere would’ve perked  this material up for me.

Wiley has really outdone himself in terms of the way this album was set up and it’s definitely his best to date. The careful blending of genres is impressive, along with the consistent theme that only a legend could teach. It was much better than I expected but my one personal criticism leads it to lose some points in my perspective.

Rating:  3.5/5

 

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wiley

After the first Godfather album last year, Wiley is back with the second instalment of the franchise. Wiley is one of the most talented and respected artists in the grime scene, much less the UK scene as a whole. I was eager to hear this one!

Wiley begins the album the way a typically grime based artist would be expected to. A grime intro plus the flows we’re used to from him.

I was first drawn to the fact that Wiley has chosen to put across a theme about having the passion for the music he wants to make, rather than making songs just for the money. In the song ‘” I call the shots”, he mentions “Chasing numbers and views” and forgetting about the mic. He references this ideology in a few other songs and that’s a running theme throughout the album.

You wouldn’t know it from the outset if you listen to the first few songs, but this album is very diverse. The structure is not what I expected but made more sense as the album progressed. It begins really ‘grimey’ then goes into softer, more mellow songs a bit later. This album seems modelled after his own career in terms of starting with grime, then dabbling in other genres later. I think this is done deliberately, sticking to the theme mentioned earlier.

I would have loved to have heard some BBK members on this album or even some old Roll Deep other than Scratchy. This is not to say Scratchy doesn’t do well because he sure does. The features really done what they needed to do in terms of their effectiveness and none of them were misplaced. I particularly enjoyed the tracks that featured the grime legends D Double E and JME. He features Shakka and one of my personal favourites Wretch 32, as well as a host of others, from MC’s to vocalists. I feel like Wiley was very aware what each artist featured, brought to the table.

He went very traditional with an album length of 12 songs, something that’s almost unheard of in the streaming era. I think he put this amount of songs on the album to show how thorough he was when making it, as opposed to putting rubbish on for streaming purposes, which would open the possibility of making more money from this project.

My only criticism of this album is a personal one. As a fan since Wiley was spitting bars on radio sets and forming different crews, I would’ve liked to hear something that sounded old school. While I’m aware that artists move with the times, the fan in me is what made me listen to the album. Possibly a freestyle on an old school beat, even as an interlude somewhere would’ve perked  this material up for me.

Wiley has really outdone himself in terms of the way this album was set up and it’s definitely his best to date. The careful blending of genres is impressive, along with the consistent theme that only a legend could teach. It was much better than I expected but my one personal criticism leads it to lose some points in my perspective.

Rating:  3.5/5

 

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